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The Karamu Nutrition Program (KNP) is the largest and one of the fastest growing non-profit food program sponsors in Tennessee. Karamu’s founder and Executive Director, Dr. Vera Corley-Sims, is a retired childcare provider and a nationally known advocate for provider and children’s causes.

 

Karamu is a provider friendly organization which has built a strong reputation of treating its providers with respect and courtesy; Dr. Vera will have it no other way!

 

Karamu’s mission is to provide a variety of services for childcare providers. However, our core service is CACFP sponsorship. In fact, Dr. Vera originally founded Karamu to serve as a CACFP sponsor.

Karamu Is A Proud Member Of (Or Contributor To) The Following National Organizations:

Karamu Nutrition Program Inc.

2670 Union Ave Ext

Suite 900

Memphis, TN 38112

 

phone: 901.327.8401 

e-mail: karamu@karamu.org

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Karamu - The Provider's Choice

Karamu Nutrition Program, Inc. is a 501(c)(3) organization. Gifts are deductible to the full extent allowable under IRS regulations.

© 2017 by Karamu Inc.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

PROGRAMS

Karamu is a proud sponsor of various USDA Child Nutrition Programs to include the Child and Adult Care Food Program (CACFP) , The At Risk After School Program (ARAS), and in 2018 (for the first time ever) we will sponsor the Summer Food Service Program (SFSP).  In November 2017 Karamu celebrated it's 25th year as a CACFP sponsor - making us one of the most experienced and most trusted Child Nutrition sponsors in the state of Tennessee! Whether you are a child care center or child care home, Karamu has a Child Nutrition Program for you.  In some cases, you don't even need a child care license to participate.

To learn more about the various Child Nutrition Programs we offer, click on the pictures below for links to information on the Child Nutrition Program that's right for you.

When school is out and parents are still at work, children need a safe place to be with their friends, with structured activities, supportive adults, and good nutrition. Community-based programs that offer enrichment activities for at-risk children and youth, 18 and under, after the regular school day ends, can provide free meals and snacks through CACFP. Programs must be offered in areas where at least 50 percent of the children are eligible for free and reduced price meals based upon school data.

CACFP supports institutions that want to initiate or improve food service in a variety of settings, including adult daycare centers. Adult care centers receive payments for serving nutritious meals to adults who are 60 or older, or who are physically or mentally impaired to the extent that limits their independence and ability to carry out activities of daily living.  CACFP meals give adults the nutrition they need as a routine part of their day care program. CACFP reimbursements help to lower the cost of serving meals at centers that provide adult day care services to meet the needs of functionally impaired adults.

CACFP provides reimbursement for meals and snacks served to small groups of children receiving nonresidential day care in private homes that are licensed or alternately approved to provide family child care. CACFP targets higher levels of reimbursement to low-income areas, and to day care providers and children most in need. The reimbursements make the cost of day care more affordable for many lower income families. Health and safety standards, training, and monitoring make CACFP an important component of quality child care, especially in family day care homes.

Eligible public or private nonprofit child care centers, outside-school-hours care centers, Head Start programs, and other institutions which are licensed or approved to provide day care services may participate in CACFP, independently or as sponsored centers. For profit centers must receive title XX funds for at least 25 percent of enrolled children or licensed capacity (whichever is less) or at least 25 percent of the children in care must be eligible for free and reduced price meals. Meals served to children are reimbursed at rates based upon a child's eligibility for free, reduced price, or paid meals.

The Summer Food Service Program (SFSP) ensures that low-income children continue to receive nutritious meals when school is not in session. This summer, USDA plans to serve more than 200 million free meals to children 18 years and under at approved SFSP sites.

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